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Smoking Turkey


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#1 Bram Britcher

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 07:17 PM

Could anyone share some advice/recipes for smoked turkey? First time doing turkey on a pit and I'd really like to take the bird to the next level.

Thanks in advance,
Bram

#2 Thom Emery

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 07:50 PM

Well Next Level BBQ is a win/win here in California
Bram what are you going to cook the bird on?
I seem to recall you have a Klose Off Set

#3 Bram Britcher

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 08:39 PM

Yes, I have a small Klose - but I was thinking of cooking the Turkey on an Egg.

#4 Bram Britcher

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 09:04 PM

From what I'm reading elsewhere - sounds like I should be brining already.

#5 Thom Emery

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 05:03 AM

That sounds funny cooking the Turkey on a Egg
Which came first?
Are you going to Japan in January?

#6 Peter Benac

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 08:14 AM

Bram,

If you haven't read this one please do. I have done two with a modified version of Mad Max's setup and they were simply marvelous.

Mad Max King of the Turkey

#7 Ben Lobenstein

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 09:06 AM

I brine for 24 hours in a garlic, salt, bay leaf apple juice mix. Rub skin with some oil and rub. Then cook on the smoker @ 325-375 for 4 hours or so with a fruit wood = Turfection.

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 01:18 PM

Agree with Ben. We did a test run the otherday in a Kamado. 12 pounder, injected with
Creole Butter, no brine. Rub on outside with butter and seasoning. 275 - 300 for about 4hrs.with a chunk or two of fruitwood
Baste with whatever. Very, very nice.

I would check temp in the front and back of the breast. The rear of the breast seems to be the last part to fully cook. The one we do on Thurs I will run the cooker to 300-325 or more.

#9 Bram Britcher

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 07:17 AM

All, thanks for the input and have a Happy Thanksgiving.

Peter,
Mad Max's ice bag on the breast is interesting trick. Did you use that in your modified setups?

#10 Peter Benac

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 08:04 AM

Posted By Bram Britcher on 11/22/2006 10:17 AM
All, thanks for the input and have a Happy Thanksgiving.

Peter,
Mad Max's ice bag on the breast is interesting trick. Did you use that in your modified setups?




My setup was eggactly like Max's. My recipe was different and I used an XL BGE. Yes I used the Ice Bags. I had a hard time stopping my wife from opening the Zip Lock bag and stealing ice for her drink, but the bag did it's job.

I had a Maverick Probe in the Breast Meat and one deep in the Thigh. The both came to their respective temps just about the same time. After sitting in the Refrigerator Since Sunday the sandwich I made today is still the moistest breast meat I ever had.

My bird was stuffed and the stuffing was great too.

#11 Bill Evans

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 10:00 AM

I like the ice idea. That should work for whole chickens as well.

#12 Peter Benac

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 07:33 PM

Posted By Bill Evans on 02/07/2007 1:00 PM
I like the ice idea. That should work for whole chickens as well.




Same principle different bird. Works just fine.

#13 Jason Fisher

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 01:48 PM

Well the time has come and I think I'll bring this thread back alive I hope with a few new questions.

Bram, how did your bird come out on the egg?

Peter, I see you stuffed your bird, got a good recipe you could pass on to me?

I'm going to attempt to cook a turkey on my egg this year and it looks like I'll probably go with the Mad Max method.

Thanks.

#14 Ben Lobenstein

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 02:26 PM

I'm doing 2 and a big pile of drumsticks for the foster kids center tommorow.

#15 Tom Chilton

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 03:04 PM

I cooked a turkey on my BGE last week. I mostly did the Mad Max method. I also salted it using the following method from Russ Parsons. It came out really good.

Click here for an interview with Russ Parsons about dry brining

A simple way to get the full flavor out of meats is to let it marinate in salt. Los Angeles Times food writer and author Russ Parsons shares tips on salt brining. He recommends brining turkey in a large pot of salted water or salt rubbing the skin. His latest book is How to Pick a Peach.

Roast Salted Turkey
Serves 11 to 15 people

This is more a technique than a recipe. It makes a bird that has concentrated turkey flavor and fine, firm flesh delicious as it is. But you can add other flavors as you wish. Minced rosemary would be a nice finishing addition. Or brush the bird lightly with butter before roasting.

1 (12- to 16-pound) turkey

Kosher salt

1. Wash the turkey inside and out, pat it dry and weigh it. Measure 1 tablespoon of salt into a bowl for every 5 pounds the turkey weighs (for a 15-pound turkey, you'd have 3 tablespoons.)

2. Sprinkle the inside of the turkey lightly with salt. Place the turkey on its back and salt the breasts, concentrating the salt in the center, where the meat is thickest. You'll probably use a little more than a tablespoon. It should look liberally seasoned, but not over-salted.

3. Turn the turkey on one side and sprinkle the entire side with salt, concentrating on the thigh. You should use a little less than a tablespoon. Flip the turkey over and do the same with the opposite side.

4. Place the turkey in a 2 1/2 -gallon sealable plastic bag, press out the air and seal tightly. Place the turkey breast-side up in the refrigerator. Chill for 3 days, turning it onto its breast for the last day.

5. Remove the turkey from the bag. There should be no salt visible on the surface and the skin should be moist but not wet. Place the turkey breast-side up on a plate and refrigerate uncovered for at least 8 hours.

6. On the day it is to be cooked, remove the turkey from the refrigerator and leave it at room temperature at least 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

7. Place the turkey breast-side down on a roasting rack in a roasting pan; put it in the oven. After 30 minutes, remove the pan from the oven and carefully turn the turkey over so the breast is facing up (it's easiest to do this by hand, using kitchen towels or oven mitts.)

8. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees, return the turkey to the oven and roast until a thermometer inserted in the deepest part of the thigh, but not touching the bone, reads 165 degrees, about 2 3/4 hours total roasting.

9. Remove the turkey from the oven, transfer it to a warm platter or carving board; tent loosely with foil. Let stand at least 30 minutes to let the juices redistribute through the meat. Carve and serve.

Edited by Tom Chilton, 14 November 2007 - 03:29 PM.


#16 Jason Fisher

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 03:14 PM

Interesting technique Tom, kind of a dry brine I suppose. I usually wet brine with herbs and citrus, but I may have to try this dry brine.

#17 harry stewart

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 10:22 AM

View PostBram Britcher, on Nov 20 2006, 07:17 PM, said:

Could anyone share some advice/recipes for smoked turkey? First time doing turkey on a pit and I'd really like to take the bird to the next level.

Thanks in advance,
Bram

Bram

Select a good brine. also use apple amd mesquite to cook over,

I have a brine recipe if your interested


2-1/2 gallons cold water
2 cups kosher salt
1 cup sugar
2 bay leaves, torn into pieces
1 bunch fresh thyme, or 4 tablespoons dried
1 whole head of garlic, peeled
5 whole allspice berries, crushed
4 juniper berries, crushed



Place the water in a large pot that can easily hold the liquid and the meat you intend to brine.

Add all the ingredients and stir for a minute or so until the sugar and salt dissolve.

Refrigerate poultry in the brine for 24 hours; pork for 3 days. If the meat floats to the top, use a plate or other weight to keep it completely submerged in the brine.





Secrets of Success:
The brine. The brine infuses flavor into pork, chicken, and turkey and makes the meat tender and succulent.

#18 Ben Lobenstein

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:10 AM

View Postharry stewart, on Nov 16 2007, 10:22 AM, said:

Bram

Select a good brine. also use apple amd mesquite to cook over,

I have a brine recipe if your interested


2-1/2 gallons cold water
2 cups kosher salt
1 cup sugar
2 bay leaves, torn into pieces
1 bunch fresh thyme, or 4 tablespoons dried
1 whole head of garlic, peeled
5 whole allspice berries, crushed
4 juniper berries, crushed



Place the water in a large pot that can easily hold the liquid and the meat you intend to brine.

Add all the ingredients and stir for a minute or so until the sugar and salt dissolve.

Refrigerate poultry in the brine for 24 hours; pork for 3 days. If the meat floats to the top, use a plate or other weight to keep it completely submerged in the brine.





Secrets of Success:
The brine. The brine infuses flavor into pork, chicken, and turkey and makes the meat tender and succulent.

In years past I have brined religously, for the birds I did yesterday, I decided not to. I injected and iced a la Mad Max, cooked over apple only - best damn (moistest) turkey I have ever had.

#19 Jason Fisher

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:15 AM

View PostBen Lobenstein, on Nov 16 2007, 11:10 AM, said:

In years past I have brined religously, for the birds I did yesterday, I decided not to. I injected and iced a la Mad Max, cooked over apple only - best damn (moistest) turkey I have ever had.

I'm thinking about brining and injecting one and using the Mad Max method. It should be the turkey to end all other turkeys!! :o

#20 Pat Brandon

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:00 PM

I Use a wet Brine and soke my Bird for 48 hrs or more . Smoke the bird with Cherry wood for two hrs at 275 and then turn up the heat too 375 untill done.




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