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Buffalo Tri-Tip


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#1 chad quarrey

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 08:08 PM

Anyone have any suggestions or ideas for Buffalo Tri-Tip?
I have two 4 pounders and I am looking for some help. Should I smoke them or Grill them?

#2 Ric Gilbert

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 09:59 PM

View Postchad quarrey, on 09 February 2011 - 08:08 PM, said:

Anyone have any suggestions or ideas for Buffalo Tri-Tip?
I have two 4 pounders and I am looking for some help. Should I smoke them or Grill them?

Buffalo Tri-Tip, where did you find that? How much was it a pound? Is it buffalo or beefalo? Either way, it would be more lean then a beef Tri-Tip so I suggest a hot and fast cook.


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#3 matt brailey

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 10:54 PM

Be sure to let it sit out for as much as four hours at room temperature. Buffalo has enzymes, just like beef, that when activated for as long as possible create delicious flavors and improve texture. This is what happens during the dry aging process. The enzymatic action is started and controlled by keeping the temperature of the aging facility cool but not as cold as a fridge. Since these enzymes are increasingly active until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 140, letting the meat sit for a while will help make it more delicious. When you do cook it, I would suggest that you hot smoke it at around 300 to 325 until the internal temperature is 130F. Then do a finishing sear over direct heat for a couple of minutes per side to get a little bit of browning, but without burning the rub.

Bear in mind that the lack of intramuscular fat will pretty much mean that it will not be as juicy as beef. In my opinion, there is very little you can do about that short of buying a larding needle and introducing fat to the roast. Another technique is barding which could involve wrapping with sheets of caul fat or bacon. The trade off is that the fat layer will act as a buffer to smoke penetration and will have to be removed for a successful maillard reaction to occur. In my book that eliminates it as a potential solution.

That said, even if it isn't super moist, it still ought to be pretty tasty because buffalo is delicious.

Let us know how it turns out.

Matt

#4 Ric Gilbert

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 08:38 AM

Professor Meat has spoken...Geeez Matt, now I've got to start upgrading my answers. Short quips just aren't going to cut it anymore.

ric

#5 chad quarrey

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 04:32 PM

Ric
I got the Buffalo form a friend who knows a guy that has a ranch in Montana. He said he sells in Redwood City. I will find out the name of the place and let you know.

Matt
Thanks for the advise. I was told to add bacon but was afraid of the same issues.

I will let you guys know how it turns out.
Chad




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