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Cook time/temp for Tri Tip?


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#1 Shayne Pharis

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 10:12 AM

I've never actually BBQ'd Tri Tip, always just grilled it.
What are some basic guidelines for temp and time on a tri-tip?

Is there a huge difference in BBQing a Tri Tip as appose to grilling it? ....more tender i'd assume.

What internal temp are you looking for as well?


TIA,
Shayne

#2 Kevin Barteaux

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 01:50 PM

View PostShayne Pharis, on 07 January 2011 - 10:12 AM, said:

I've never actually BBQ'd Tri Tip, always just grilled it.
What are some basic guidelines for temp and time on a tri-tip?

Is there a huge difference in BBQing a Tri Tip as appose to grilling it? ....more tender i'd assume.

What internal temp are you looking for as well?


TIA,
Shayne
Smoke at 200F until it gets to 125F internal. Let it rest under loose foil until it gets to at least 130F, then grill it over high heat for 2-minutes per side for a nice sear and medium rare throughout.

#3 Shayne Pharis

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 04:06 PM

View PostKevin Barteaux, on 07 January 2011 - 01:50 PM, said:

Smoke at 200F until it gets to 125F internal. Let it rest under loose foil until it gets to at least 130F, then grill it over high heat for 2-minutes per side for a nice sear and medium rare throughout.


very nice, thanks Kevin.

#4 Pat Kennealy

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 10:58 PM

cook indirect at 250 - 300 degrees approx 1 1/2 hrs, pull and rest between 130-135.

Edited by Pat Kennealy, 07 January 2011 - 10:59 PM.


#5 Shayne Pharis

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 08:42 AM

1 to 1.5 hr's.... how big are you talking? id imagine it will differ depending upon the size of the tri tip.

#6 John Bracamonte

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 06:30 PM

I sear first then roast/smoke at a temp near 300 until an internal of 125 to 130, depending on how you like it. Make sure to give a nice long rest.

#7 Sylvie Curry

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 12:14 PM

I use John's technique. However, I only let it go to 125 then pull. The carry over temp usually gets the internal temp to 130-135. I like it nice and pink medium rare.

#8 Pat Kennealy

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 03:56 PM

View PostShayne Pharis, on 08 January 2011 - 08:42 AM, said:

1 to 1.5 hr's.... how big are you talking? id imagine it will differ depending upon the size of the tri tip.

Typically they run 2 - 3 pounds. But I should warn you, I may also be opening and closing the doors for other meats and sides, so your actual time will vary.

Also, since I only use a dry rub, I don't sear. It would lose/scorch the rub. So these go on raw, which takes a little longer. (used to sear when I marinated with liquid, but that was before I got properly edgumacated ;-)

Edited by Pat Kennealy, 10 January 2011 - 03:57 PM.


#9 Shayne Pharis

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 01:45 PM

so i did the tri tip last night and it turned out "okay" .... i should say i made it work...

I seared on all sides for roughly 2-3 min's on high heat to get it sealed then i tossed it on the Q and set my thermo for 130... it seemed to be cooking much faster then I had imagined so I actually let it go until the thermo read 140. Pulled it and let it rest for a good 30 min's... but when I cut into it it was still pretty rare. I actually like rare but it was even beyond that, so i had to toss it back on for another 30 min's or so and i cranked the temp up to 350* to get the ball moving.... once I pulled it the second time it was medium.

I dunno if its my temp gauge or what... i'm gonna set it to 160* next time and see how it turns out because clearly it wasn't at 140* although it said it was at 140*

no biggie, first time, certainly not the last :)

#10 John Bracamonte

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 03:46 PM

I'd have to imagine that there was a problem with the accuracy of the meat thermometer. At 140 it would have been at least medium. Was the probe through the center of the meat? Any way it was touching anything other than the meat such as the grate or the sides of the Q?

#11 Shayne Pharis

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 05:12 PM

nah i made sure it was directly in the thickest part of the tri tip. To my knowledge it wasn't touching anything or else the temp would have probably been screaming.

#12 Bill Bain

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 06:01 PM

View PostShayne Pharis, on 15 January 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

nah i made sure it was directly in the thickest part of the tri tip. To my knowledge it wasn't touching anything or else the temp would have probably been screaming.

A Thermopen will solve that problem.

#13 Ben Lobenstein

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 06:38 PM

Double check your thermo, super easy to do, eliminates any guessing in that dept.

#14 matt brailey

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 08:08 PM

Drop that thermometer in boiling water and see if it hits 212 or in a cup of heavily salted water filled with crushed ice and see if you get to 32. Those are the two simplest ways I know of to check the accuracy of your thermometer.

You definitely want to make sure that you have the ability to gauge the temperature of the cooker at the grate as well as the tri tip on an extremely accurate basis.

Also, one minor point about searing. When you do a sear, you are creating a tasty outer crust through the magic of the Maillard reaction. You are NOT sealing in the juices. Common misconception.

Matt

#15 Leonard Sanders

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 10:54 PM

Thermometers will screw you up Use my time tested method--cook several cases of tri tip all at once and never use a thermometer.

Ask Bill Bain how it works

#16 Kevin Barteaux

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 01:10 AM

View Postmatt brailey, on 15 January 2011 - 08:08 PM, said:


Also, one minor point about searing. When you do a sear, you are creating a tasty outer crust through the magic of the Maillard reaction. You are NOT sealing in the juices. Common misconception.

Matt
+1 Matt. In fact it has been shown that you actually lose more juices when searing at the beginning, which is why I prefer to sear roasts at the end.

#17 Shayne Pharis

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 08:15 AM

This is getting interesting, learn something new everyday. I certainly did not know that...

That thermo pen is pretty expensive, it was partially my own fault as well because when I used my tongs to "press test" the meat it felt like it wasn't done either.

If the exterior of the meat is sealed wouldn't it reduce the amount of juice coming out of the piece of meat?

I understand the theory behind losing alot while searing. After the sear though wouldn't it be harder for juice to pass through?

#18 K & K MacIntosh

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 08:30 AM

View PostShayne Pharis, on 17 January 2011 - 08:15 AM, said:

That thermo pen is pretty expensive, it was partially my own fault as well because when I used my tongs to "press test" the meat it felt like it wasn't done either.
Here is an alternative to the Thermapen. It isn't as rugged (although I believe it's waterproof). It has a very fast response and can be calibrated to maintain accuracy. It was my favorite thermometer (before I got the Thermapen).

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B000GIZ5HY

Kelly

#19 Adam Hollman

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 10:17 AM

Thermapens are on sale right now and are well worth the cabbage. We use ours almost every day in the kitchen, and then of course, when I BBQ. The makers of Thermapen (Thermaworks) have other things on sale too...like their oven thermometer for $15. I would buy anything they make, and if you are looking for something, it might be worth cruising their website.

#20 Kevin Barteaux

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 11:06 AM

View PostShayne Pharis, on 17 January 2011 - 08:15 AM, said:


If the exterior of the meat is sealed wouldn't it reduce the amount of juice coming out of the piece of meat?

I understand the theory behind losing alot while searing. After the sear though wouldn't it be harder for juice to pass through?
As it turns out, you are actually damaging the cell walls when you sear, thereby making them less able to retain moisture. It is the same principle why cooking at lower temps allow for more even cooking throughout.




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