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tri-tip hints


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#1 scott millman

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 05:01 PM

I know its against the rule, but Im deep frying a tri-tip for Christmas....anyone have any suggestions on a rub, marinade or injection?....even plain I cant wait to taste it....let alone Christmas eve and crab legs til I bust a gut hehhehehehe....any info is appreciated, Happy Holidays my friends, Scott.

#2 Ed Brown

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 05:09 PM

Scott- Google "pitchforkfondue". They do ribeyes in deep fat and they are fantastic. They don't take long and you season them after. Good stuff. Ed Brown

#3 scott millman

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 05:10 PM

View PostEd Brown, on Dec 20 2007, 05:09 PM, said:

Scott- Google "pitchforkfondue". They do ribeyes in deep fat and they are fantastic. They don't take long and you season them after. Good stuff. Ed Brown
Ed, thank you sir....I will certainly give it a look, Happy Holidays.

#4 Pat Burke

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 08:24 PM

View Postscott millman, on Dec 20 2007, 05:01 PM, said:

I know its against the rule, but Im deep frying a tri-tip for Christmas....anyone have any suggestions on a rub, marinade or injection?....even plain I cant wait to taste it....let alone Christmas eve and crab legs til I bust a gut hehhehehehe....any info is appreciated, Happy Holidays my friends, Scott.

That should be interesting :blink: . I have never thought about deep frying a tri-tip... I cant wait to hear how it turns out and then experimenting myself! Let us know how it turns out!

#5 Glen Stanley

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 04:56 AM

My supervisor does a prime rib roast in his turkey fryer every year for X-Mas dinner. He swears it's the best he's ever had.

#6 Brian Kreisler

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 04:11 PM

View PostGlen Stanley, on Dec 21 2007, 04:56 AM, said:

My supervisor does a prime rib roast in his turkey fryer every year for X-Mas dinner. He swears it's the best he's ever had.

Can you get the details? I would like to try it.

#7 Glen Stanley

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 04:28 PM

Brian,

I'll talk to him on Monday, and I'll post it here............

#8 Jon Davis

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 07:19 PM

View PostBrian Kreisler, on Dec 22 2007, 12:11 AM, said:

Can you get the details? I would like to try it.
Ive done this one before, and it turned out great! This is from a radio show dj that i listen to.

Just like with turkey, you will be amazed with the juicy tender flavor of this recipe. Keep in mind however, that unlike turkey, a rib roast prepared in the oven is not bland at all. Personally, I don't find deep fried prime rib to be any better than a traditionally prepared one. However, it is always a show stopper amongst guests to deep fry anything, and you certainly don't lose anything in the flavor department doing it this way.

This recipe produces rare meat in the middle (red throughout) and medium rare cuts on the ends (pink with some brown). This is how Beef should be prepared and served. If you are insane and like your meat medium or worse, cook this roast to 130 degrees in step 9 and don't blame me when your meat is tough and lacks flavor. Oh by the way, you're an idiot, too.


FOR THE SEASONING MIX:
2 tablespoons kosher or sea salt
2 tablespoons fresh thyme
2 tablespoons pepper
Olive oil
FOR THE FRYING:
One 7 Pound prime beef rib roast (figure about pound per person. This size should feed 10 people)
One Turkey fryer
Peanut oil (approx 3-5 gallons) As an alternative, you can use canola or vegetable oil if you must, but it is not ideal

To Make...

1. Make sure the roast is fully thawed by placing it in the refrigerator at least 2 full days before cooking.

2. The night before roasting, drizzle olive oil along the outside of the roast, and rub generous amounts of seasoning mix all over the roast. (You are creating what is called a "dry-rub") The seasonings not only bring out the beef's flavors, but also help to keep the meat tender.

3. Cover the meat (I use a roasting pan with a large lid so that nothing like saran wrap is actually touching the meat) and refrigerate over night. Remove from the fridge at least an hour before cooking, and place onto your frying rack, per the fryer's instructions.

4. Fill your large pot approx. full with peanut oil and heat to 325 degrees. Carefully lower the roast into the oil as directed by the fryer's manufacturer.

5. Allow 3 minutes per pound before checking the roast. To do so safely, have someone raise the roast at least halfway removed from the oil, and test the center. The roast is done when the thermometer reads 115 degrees in the very middle, for rare meat in the middle as explained above.

6. Place the done roast on a roasting pan which has been covered with brown paper bags to absorb the oil. Let roast rest for 10 minutes, then carve. To do so, place roast, ribs down and place your very sharp knife just above the top of the bones into the meat. Slice all the way through, allowing you to then fold the meat away from the bones. Cut the meat completely from the bones, then carve the rib roast like a roast beef, serving slices to your guests. Serve the bones, sliced into individual bones, alongside as garnish and for the cavemen in your party to nibble on.

7. As an alternative, you can slice giant slabs of your beef by simply knifing between each bone and creating giant sized rib-eyes for each of your guests.

#9 Thom Emery

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 07:39 PM

Nice Post Jon

#10 Pat Burke

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 08:11 PM

View Postscott millman, on Dec 20 2007, 05:01 PM, said:

I know its against the rule, but Im deep frying a tri-tip for Christmas....anyone have any suggestions on a rub, marinade or injection?....even plain I cant wait to taste it....let alone Christmas eve and crab legs til I bust a gut hehhehehehe....any info is appreciated, Happy Holidays my friends, Scott.

Scott, I'll be waiting for the Tri-Tip results... :rolleyes:

Edited by Pat Burke, 23 December 2007 - 08:12 PM.





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